Lagoon 55

Description

Lagoon launched their first catamaran, the original 55, back in 1987. Fast forward to 2021, and the first new generation Lagoon 55 splashed representing almost 4 decades of development and design evolution from this famous French catamaran manufacturer.

Lagoon celebrated its 6,000th catamaran launch in 2021 since 1987, quite a milestone.

These days, the Lagoon brand is all about maximising comfort and space while maintaining decent performance under sail. On a test sail off Port Ginesta (our home base near Barcelona), we achieved 9.7 knots with the Code 0 up in a moderate breeze of 15 knots on a beam reach (apparent wind angle of 75).

Looking around the boat, they have certainly delivered on the comfort and space, and we’d say they have delivered on the second point too.

The 55 represents a big step up from the 52 with a bigger beam, redesigned aft cockpit and transoms, a full flybridge, saloon skylights and an improved foredeck. Let’s take a look.

Photos Credit Nicolas Claris, Lagoon, Katamarans

Of course, with all of that space comes weight: 27.7 tonnes of it with no kit on.

When the wind heads below 7 knots, your speed will drop away and you will need to motor sail, particularly at tighter angles to the wind. That is your compromise.

Pros

  • Huge living space from the aft platform to the forward cockpit with the flybridge added for good measure
  • A step up in quality and design in the interiors compared to smaller models
  • Decent performance for the amount of space and weight of this boat.

Cons

  • You will need good crew to manage this boat in the marina.
  • Not much feel on the helm.
  • Once you add the options, the price can accelerate.

Living Area

The next generation Lagoon 55 from Bordeaux has some interesting innovations. The sugarscoops have been stretched aft making access to the boat even easier. The aft platform is flush with the aft cockpit deck, and with no aft beam the whole area opens up into a terrace at anchor.

Nauta Design are responsible for the interior design and overall they have done a great job.

The boat feels like a smaller Sixty 5 rather than a bigger 52, it’s the new generation alright. The L-shaped galley on the starboard side has a bar attached, and the huge sofa will soak up plenty of guests. The saloon table will fit 8-10 people when fully extended.

The overall feel is warm and cosy.

Heading through you arrive in the enormous saloon (27 m² or 290 sq ft) which is linked to the the forward cockpit via a large fully opening front window. Here you have another large sofa area and a deck that is flush with the nets. There is an option for a shade sail on carbon poles.

Helming is done from the flybridge with a rigid bimini that is accessed from the port side deck (there is an option for an additional access to starboard which would make the journey to the trampolines easier). The flybridge has forward and aft sunbathing areas, an outdoor galley / bar area, and forward-facing table and seating.

Sailing

Visibility is great from the flybridge of course, and all lines come down to the foot of the mast (set further aft in keeping with the other models in this Lagoon generation) and the halyards and sheets are managed using three powerful winches. Given the size of this boat, you will need someone to help when coming into the marina.

The mainsail can be hoisted by a single crew member thanks to the electric winches.

During our test sail off Port Ginesta, we hit 7-8 knots in a 15 knot breeze with full mainsail and jib. Once the 154m² Code 0 was unfurled, we accelerated to almost 10 knots with the wind on the beam. Not bad for a boat weighing over 30 tonnes with all the gear on.

You can expect to sail at around 70% of TWS with the bigger sails flying off the bowsprit unless the wind really dies, and then you will need to motor-sail.

With the 272m² asymmetric spinnaker, you will maximise your speed heading on a broad reach as well. Lagoon are reporting 6 knots in only 7 knots of true wind, 8 knots in 10. You are not going to be breaking any speed records on the Lagoon 55, but the performance is nevertheless impressive for such a spacious boat.

There’s plenty of room for sails on this boat, it makes sense to stock the sail locker up with some big ‘uns.

Down Below

The living space is enormous in the hulls thanks to the pronounced chimes.

The Lagoon 55 is available with four, five and six-cabin versions. In the four-cabin version , the owner’s cabin (17.5 m² or 188 sq. ft.)  is aft in the starboard hull and fills two-thirds of the hull. The other three cabins each have an en-suite.

Summary

The Lagoon 55 (2001) is so different from the original model launched 34 years before, and represents how Lagoon’s design philosophy and DNA has changed in over 3 decades of development.

Performance catamaran enthusiasts may prefer the older model, but Lagoon has already sold more new 55s than the total number of original 55s produced. They know their market. The bottom line is that there is more market demand for this kind of package.

For comfort, space, sailing ability and value for money, this cruising catamaran ticks a lot of boxes.

FAQs

What is the price of a Lagoon 55 (2021)? How much does this catamaran cost?
As always, we will qualify this with “it depends on your options”, but to give you an idea, you will start the conversation at around €1.1m and head up to €1.4-1.5m depending on how you kit the boat out.

Technical Specification

Length OA

16,56 m / 54'4''

Beam

9,00 m / 29'6''

Draft

1,55 m / 5'1''

Mast Clearance

28,93 m / 94'11"

Light Displ.

27,7 T / 61,079 Lbs

D/L

170

Upwind Sail Area

181 m² / 1,948 sq ft

Mainsail

107 m² / 1,151 sq ft

Jib

74 m² / 796 sq ft

SA/D

20

Power (Std)

2 x 80 CV / 2 x 80 HP

Power (Option)

2 x 115 CV / 2 x 115 HP

Fuel

1100 L / 291 US gal

Fresh Water

960 L / 254 US gal

Architect